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Posts tagged with ‘festival’
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commovente:

Hari Kuyo is a Japanese festival dedicated to old and broken needles. Celebrated every year on the 8th of February, this festival sees hundreds of women dressed in colorful kimonos, gathering at various Shinto shrines or Buddhist temples in and around Tokyo. This 400-year-old ritual involves sticking old and broken needles into soft chunks of tofu or jelly as a way of showing thanks for their hard work. I suppose this tradition springs from the Eastern system of displaying gratitude towards objects that are a source of livelihood. It also reflects on the animist belief that all beings and objects have a soul.
It’s not just about needles, several Japanese women consider Hari Kuyo as a time to value the small, everyday objects of daily life that are otherwise forgotten. Mottainai is the concept of not being wasteful about small things. Burying needles in tofu is said to symbolize rest for the needles, as they are wrapped with tenderness. It’s also about the many sorrows that women are believed to carry in their hearts, the burdens of which are passed on to the needles during many hours of sewing. So the needles do deserve a proper farewell and rest at the end of their service. According to Ryojo Shioiri, a Buddhist monk, “Sometimes there are painful things and secrets that women can’t tell men, and they put these secrets into the pins and ask the gods to get rid of them.” (source) 

commovente:

Hari Kuyo is a Japanese festival dedicated to old and broken needles. Celebrated every year on the 8th of February, this festival sees hundreds of women dressed in colorful kimonos, gathering at various Shinto shrines or Buddhist temples in and around Tokyo. This 400-year-old ritual involves sticking old and broken needles into soft chunks of tofu or jelly as a way of showing thanks for their hard work. I suppose this tradition springs from the Eastern system of displaying gratitude towards objects that are a source of livelihood. It also reflects on the animist belief that all beings and objects have a soul.

It’s not just about needles, several Japanese women consider Hari Kuyo as a time to value the small, everyday objects of daily life that are otherwise forgotten. Mottainai is the concept of not being wasteful about small things. Burying needles in tofu is said to symbolize rest for the needles, as they are wrapped with tenderness. It’s also about the many sorrows that women are believed to carry in their hearts, the burdens of which are passed on to the needles during many hours of sewing. So the needles do deserve a proper farewell and rest at the end of their service. According to Ryojo Shioiri, a Buddhist monk, “Sometimes there are painful things and secrets that women can’t tell men, and they put these secrets into the pins and ask the gods to get rid of them.” (source

(via heavenforbears)

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electricegg:

Otto Hits the Capital
The UK’s largest international animation festival, London International Animation Festival open’s tonight at the Barbican in London ahead of 11 days of workshops, talks, retrospectives and a broad array of diverse and creative animation from across the globe. Highlights include a masterclass by Japanese auteur Koji Yamamura, the gala opening of “No Good Reason” a film about the artist Ralph Steadman, famous for his illustrations and animated work for Hunter S Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (see trailer). Amongst this amazing line up of films and animation royalty our very own “What Does Otto See?” features in an late-night screening of weird and wonderful short films at the Horse Hospital in Bloomsbury on Friday 2nd of November at 2100 - suitably dubbed the “Late Night Bizarre” Screening.
Both the director, Neil Baker & the writer and character designer Benjamin Dalby will be in attendance at the festival and will both introduce the film before the screening. Tickets cost £10 but include the preceding Music Videos screening at 1930.If you are in the area head on down it looks like an amazing programme of shorts. If you want to see the trailer for “What Does Otto See?” click the link.

electricegg:

Otto Hits the Capital


The UK’s largest international animation festival, London International Animation Festival open’s tonight at the Barbican in London ahead of 11 days of workshops, talks, retrospectives and a broad array of diverse and creative animation from across the globe. Highlights include a masterclass by Japanese auteur Koji Yamamura, the gala opening of “No Good Reason” a film about the artist Ralph Steadman, famous for his illustrations and animated work for Hunter S Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (see trailer). Amongst this amazing line up of films and animation royalty our very own “What Does Otto See?” features in an late-night screening of weird and wonderful short films at the Horse Hospital in Bloomsbury on Friday 2nd of November at 2100 - suitably dubbed the “Late Night Bizarre” Screening.

Both the director, Neil Baker & the writer and character designer Benjamin Dalby will be in attendance at the festival and will both introduce the film before the screening. Tickets cost £10 but include the preceding Music Videos screening at 1930.

If you are in the area head on down it looks like an amazing programme of shorts. If you want to see the trailer for “What Does Otto See?” click the link.

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thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the Day: Bristol, England. Irish mural artist Connor Harrington’s massive, three-story high imperial-themed piece, located behind the Nelson Street church as part of Bristol’s annual See No Evil street art festival, where a record 50,000 people this year came to see the work of 40 of the world’s top street artists showcased.
Check out the Guardian’s slideshow of work from Bristol artist 45rpm to Italy’s Pixel Pancho.
Credit: Global Street Art. Via.
View more Picture of the Day posts. Submit a photo.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the Day: Bristol, England. Irish mural artist Connor Harrington’s massive, three-story high imperial-themed piece, located behind the Nelson Street church as part of Bristol’s annual See No Evil street art festival, where a record 50,000 people this year came to see the work of 40 of the world’s top street artists showcased.

Check out the Guardian’s slideshow of work from Bristol artist 45rpm to Italy’s Pixel Pancho.

Credit: Global Street Art. Via.

View more Picture of the Day postsSubmit a photo.

(via thehappiestyeti)