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Posts tagged with ‘Nuclear’
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steveraf:

Fukushima c’est plié, on n’en parle plus ?

Dernières nouvelles de Fukushima:

  • les cœurs ont fondu
  • les cuves fuient
  • les eaux sont contaminées
  • les filtres à air des véhicules tokyoïtes font bondir les compteurs Geiger
  • un lapin est né sans oreilles (sur cette vidéo d’une chaîne russe anglophone)

certains analystes craignent une évacuation à venir de la capitale japonaise, certains imaginent encore pire…

Les vidéos sur Fukushima sont recensées par le site  2000 watts.org, plongez directement sur la centrale ici avec googleearth.

Après l’accident de Tchernobyl, l’Union Soviétique a sauvé l’Europe d’une seconde explosion (qui aurait ravagé la moitié du continent) en sacrifiant 800.000 “liquidateurs” pendant une année, comme le raconte l’hallucinant documentaire de Thomas Johnson “La bataille de Tchernobyl”.

Nos sociétés individualistes seront-elles capables d’une telle abnégation si elle s’avérait nécessaire ? A voir, sur le sujet, un second film de Thomas Johnson, étrangement prophétique : “Nucléaire en question”.

Pour vous faire votre propre opinion, je vous conseille les pages de l’ACRO (Association pour le Contrôle de la Radioactivité de l’Ouest) qui traduisent au jour le jour du japonais les informations disponibles sur tous les paramètres.

C’est passionnant et édifiant.

(via steveraf)

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To people in the United States and around the world,

I am so sorry for the uranium and plutonium that Japan has released into the environment. The fallout from Fukushima has already circled the world many times, reaching Hawaii, Alaska, and even New York.

We live 60 kilometers (37 miles) from the plant and our homes have been contaminated beyond levels seen at Chernobyl. The cesium-137 they are finding in the soil will be here for 30 years. But the government will not help us. They tell us to stay put. They tell our kids to put on masks and hats and keep going to school.

This summer, our children won’t be able to go swimming. They won’t be able to play outside. They can’t eat Fukushima’s delicious peaches. They can’t even eat the rice that the Fukushima farmers are making. They can’t go visit Fukushima’s beautiful rivers, mountains and lakes. This makes me sad. This fills me with so much regret.

Instead, our children will spend the summer in their classrooms, with no air conditioning, sweating as they try to concentrate on their lessons. We don’t even know how much radiation they’ve already been exposed to.

I was eight years old when the Fukushima Daiichi plant opened. If I had understood what they were building, I would have fought against it. I didn’t realize that it contained dangers that would threaten my children, my children’s children and their children.

I am grateful for all the aid all the world has sent us. Now, what we ask is for you to speak out against the Japanese government. Pressure them into taking action. Tell them to make protecting children their top priority.

Thank you so much,

Tomoko Hatsuzawa
Fukushima City
May 25, 2011

Letter from a Fukushima mother, translated from Japanese and published by Hiroko Tabuchi (via antemnarium)

(via antemnarium)

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slightlyundead:

Timothy Mousseau, a biological scientist, has been studying bird populations in Chernobyl along with collaborator Anders Møller of Paris-Sud University in Orsay, France, for more than a decade. In one study, Mousseau found that barn swallows living in heavily contaminated areas had much higher rates of abnormalities—ranging from partial albinism (b, c, d), deformed beaks (e, f), and bent or asymmetrical tail feathers (h, i)

slightlyundead:

Timothy Mousseau, a biological scientist, has been studying bird populations in Chernobyl along with collaborator Anders Møller of Paris-Sud University in Orsay, France, for more than a decade. In one study, Mousseau found that barn swallows living in heavily contaminated areas had much higher rates of abnormalities—ranging from partial albinism (b, c, d), deformed beaks (e, f), and bent or asymmetrical tail feathers (h, i)

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poculum:

Nature News in conjunction with Columbia University, has created a Google Earth map that shows the different population sizes surrounding nuclear power plants;  ostensibly, to demonstrate the danger threshold of other plants  worldwide, compared to the ongoing nuclear disaster at the Fukushima  Daiichi plant in Japan.
Working with the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) database run by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to pinpoint the location and size of nuclear plants, both  existing and under construction, and Columbia University’s NASA  Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center, which runs  the Global  Rural-Urban Mapping Project, to nail down accurate population numbers,  the team was able to put together a Google Earth map that very clearly  shows, via coloured circles, population density around nuclear  facilities.
Because Google Earth maps render the globe in a 3-D like image, it’s  easy to skim around and very quickly get a feeling for where the dangers  lie. For example, the United States, Europe (including Russia and  former members of the USSR), India and China quite obviously have the  bulk of nuclear plants, while the entire continents of Africa and South  America have just one each, and Australia has none.
And because circle size and colour are used to represent population  density (number of people living within 75 km [about 47 miles] of a nuclear plant),  it’s also easy to see with just a glance how many people live in areas  that would be at risk should a nuclear accident occur in that area. What stands out is how big the numbers are for some areas; for  example, the Guandong plant in China (near Hong Kong) has over twenty  eight million people living within 75 kilometers of the 1888 MW plant,  which has two reactors. Clicking on one of the circles brings up more  details, for example, at the Guandong plant, an astonishing three and a  quarter million people live within a 30 km radius; all of whom would  likely suffer some rather serious repercussions if the plant were to  have an accident on the scale of the Fukushima disaster.
View Goole Earth map Here

poculum:

Nature News in conjunction with Columbia University, has created a Google Earth map that shows the different population sizes surrounding nuclear power plants; ostensibly, to demonstrate the danger threshold of other plants worldwide, compared to the ongoing nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan.

Working with the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) database run by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to pinpoint the location and size of nuclear plants, both existing and under construction, and Columbia University’s NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center, which runs the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project, to nail down accurate population numbers, the team was able to put together a Google Earth map that very clearly shows, via coloured circles, population density around nuclear facilities.

Because Google Earth maps render the globe in a 3-D like image, it’s easy to skim around and very quickly get a feeling for where the dangers lie. For example, the United States, Europe (including Russia and former members of the USSR), India and China quite obviously have the bulk of nuclear plants, while the entire continents of Africa and South America have just one each, and Australia has none.

And because circle size and colour are used to represent population density (number of people living within 75 km [about 47 miles] of a nuclear plant), it’s also easy to see with just a glance how many people live in areas that would be at risk should a nuclear accident occur in that area.
What stands out is how big the numbers are for some areas; for example, the Guandong plant in China (near Hong Kong) has over twenty eight million people living within 75 kilometers of the 1888 MW plant, which has two reactors. Clicking on one of the circles brings up more details, for example, at the Guandong plant, an astonishing three and a quarter million people live within a 30 km radius; all of whom would likely suffer some rather serious repercussions if the plant were to have an accident on the scale of the Fukushima disaster.

View Goole Earth map Here

(via poculum-deactivated20120319)